TechTutorials - Free Computer Tutorials  







Setting up EMWAC IMS 
 


Added: 01/22/2003, Hits: 3,838, Rating: 0, Comments: 0, Votes: 0
Add To Favorites | Comment on this article
By Sean S.Pejic, MCSE

Contents:
Introduction
Preparing the Servers
Installing Microsoft DNS Server
Creating the DNS Domains
Creating the Zones
Installing EMWAC IMS
Mail-Enabling Users
Configuring the Mail Client
Testing

Introduction
In this document, we are going to describe in detail the procedure for setting up mail servers running EMWAC IMS in a non-production environment, so that the reader may become familiar with the basics of setting up mail and DNS servers. This document is not intended as a replacement for the original EMWAC IMS documentation. Instead, it offers a description of setting up working mail servers from scratch, and only the necessary features of EMWAC IMS itself are mentioned.

In the following example, we are going to install EMWAC IMS on two computers, which will act as mail servers for their respective mail domains. We are going to use Windows 2000 Server and Windows NT 4.0 Server operating systems, in order to be able to cover the small differences that exist between the two product versions when it comes to configuring EMWAC IMS and Microsoft DNS Server. Both servers in this example will be stand-alone servers, meaning that we will not be using either Active Directory or an NT 4.0 domain; rather, we will simply use DNS domains and local user accounts to support e-mail services. At this point we need to mention that IMS does function correctly within Active Directory and NT 4.0 domains. It can also function on any workstation version of Windows NT, namely Windows NT Workstation 3.51/4.0 and Windows 2000/XP Professional. However, such workstations would need to have access to a DNS server in order for EMWAC IMS to be fully operational.

The objectives of the following exercise are:

  • There will be a DNS domain named inforoot.net, with its primary zone hosted on the Windows 2000 Server computer.

  • There will be another DNS domain named easymail.org, with its primary zone hosted on the Windows NT 4.0 Server computer.

  • Users with a local user account on either computer will be able to send mail to, and receive mail from, any peer user with a local user account residing on either the local or the remote computer (i. e. belonging to either mail domain). Users will be able to use the following e-mail address formats: username@inforoot.net and username@easymail.org, respectively.


  • We assume that the reader has access to a test-lab, or has the means to build one that would satisfy the requirements of the proposed setup (perhaps by using some kind of virtual machine software). Otherwise, the reader is encouraged to extract the information that he or she needs to perform a custom setup of EMWAC IMS-based mail servers.

    Preparing the Servers



    In the given test-lab setup, there will be three computers, two acting as mail servers and one acting as a mail client using Microsoft Outlook Express. We do not actually need a separate computer to act as a mail client, since it is possible to check mail and basically do all the testing on the two servers; however, in this test-lab setup, we have a designated computer hosting mail client software for clarity in segregation of client and server roles. For simplicity, the three computers are on the same IP subnet. Whether or not the computers are the members of the same workgroup is irrelevant.

    First, we need to bind the servers to their respective DNS domains and assign static IP addresses to their network adapters.

    Windows 2000 Server:
    On the Windows 2000 computer, right-click the My Computer icon, click Properties-Network Identification-Properties, and enter the name of the computer, which is mserv. Then, click on the More… button, and in the Primary DNS suffix of this computer enter inforoot.net. Click OK four times. When asked to restart the computer, click No. Now, we need to configure the server with a static IP address, because if EMWAC IMS is running on a server that receives its TCP/IP configuration from a DHCP server, chances are it will not function correctly. Right-click the My Network Places icon, click Properties, right-click the LAN adapter icon, click Properties, select Internet Protocol (TCP/IP), click Properties, click on the Use the following IP address radio button, and enter 192.168.50.125 in the IP address field. Then, click in the Subnet mask field, and Windows will automatically enter the default Class C subnet mask – 255.255.255.0. In the default gateway field, enter 192.168.50.175. Click on the Use the following DNS server addresses radio button, and enter 192.168.50.125 in the Preferred DNS server field. Click Advanced, click the DNS tab, and in the DNS suffix for this connection field enter inforoot.net. Click OK three times, and then restart the computer. After the computer reboots, we need to check whether the desired result is achieved. We can do that by pinging the computer using its host name. Click Start-Programs-Accessories-Command Prompt and enter ping mserv. The response should be as follows:



    Windows NT 4.0 Server:

    On the Windows NT 4.0 computer, right-click the Network Neighborhood icon, click Properties, then, on the Identification tab click Change… and enter the name of the computer, which is mserv2. Click OK twice. On the Protocols tab, select TCP/IP Protocol, and click Properties. The IP address we are going to enter here is 192.168.50.175. The default gateway is 192.168.50.125. Then, on the DNS tab, in the Domain: field enter easymail.org. In the DNS Service Search Order frame click the Add... button. Enter 192.168.50.175. Click OK, click Close and when asked to restart the computer click Yes. After restarting and logging back on, we need to do the same test we did on the Windows 2000 computer. Click Start-Programs-Command Prompt and enter ping mserv2; the response should be as shown below:



    We have now created a solid foundation for building DNS and POP3/SMTP servers on both computers.

    Installing Microsoft DNS Server Service

    Windows 2000 Server:

    To install Microsoft DNS Server, click Start-Settings-Control Panel, then, double-click Add/Remove Programs. On the gray side bar click Add/Remove Windows Components, scroll down to Networking Services, select it and click on the Details... button. Place a check mark beside Domain Name System(DNS), click OK, click Next, insert the Windows 2000 Server CD-ROM when asked to do so, click OK and after that click Finish. The DNS console can now be found by clicking Start-Programs-Administrative Tools-DNS.

    Windows NT 4.0 Server:

    To install Microsoft DNS Server, right-click the Network Neighborhood icon, click Properties, click the Services tab, and then click the Add... button. Select Microsoft DNS Server and click OK. Insert the Windows NT 4.0 Server CD-ROM, then, click the Continue button. Click Close. When asked to restart the computer, click Yes. After the computer reboots, click Start-Programs-Administrative Tools(Common)-DNS Manager. We need to connect the DNS server by right-clicking Server List and clicking New Server. In the DNS Server: field enter mserv2.easymail.org. Click OK. It might take some time for the DNS server to appear functional.

    Creating the DNS Domains



    We do not actually need any DNS servers for the two EMWAC IMS mail servers in our test-lab setup solely for enabling the exchange of mail between them, as they could simply send unresolved mail (i. e. mail not meant for a server's own mail domain) to one another. On the client side, instead of DNS names, we could specify the IP addresses of the mail servers which would nullify the need for DNS lookups. However, for practice, we want to create full-featured mail servers which would require few modifications in order to integrate with a production network.

    Creating the Zones

    Root Zone (Primary, Windows 2000 Server)

    Click Start-Programs-Administrative Tools-DNS. In the DNS console, right-click MSERV, then, click New Zone... to start the wizard. Click Next on the introductory wizard page. The zone type we are creating is standard primary, so click Next again. It is a forward lookup zone. Click Next. Now that you are asked for the name of the zone, enter dot (“.”). Click Next twice. Click Finish.

    Root Zone (Secondary, Windows NT 4.0 Server)

    Click Start-Programs-Administrative Tools(Common)-DNS Manager. Double-click the server icon (mserv2.easymail.org). Right-click the same icon, click New Zone... and click the Secondary: radio-button. In the Zone: field enter “.” (dot), in the Server: field enter 192.168.50.175. Click
    Next. Click inside the Zone file: field where Windows will automatically enter the zone file name. Click Next. In the IP Master(s) field, enter 192.168.50.125. Click Add and then click Next. Click Finish.

    Reverse Lookup Zone (Primary, Windows 2000 Server)

    Click Start-Programs-Administrative Tools-DNS. Expand MSERV, click the Reverse Lookup Zones folder, right-click the folder, and click New Zone... to start the wizard. Click Next on the introductory wizard page. The zone type we are creating is standard primary, so click Next again. In the Network ID: field enter 192.168.50 and click Next twice. Click Finish. To add a pointer record for the servers, click the 192.168.50.x Subnet folder, right-click the same folder, and click New Pointer... Enter 125 in the Host IP Number: field, then, in the Host Name: field enter mserv.inforoot.net. Click OK. Repeat the procedure for adding a pointer record described above and add a pointer for mserv2.easymail.org, entering the following information: 175 and mserv2.easymail.org.

    Reverse Lookup Zone (Secondary, Windows NT 4.0 Server)

    Click Start-Programs-Administrative Tools(Common)-DNS Manager. Double-click the server icon (mserv2.easymail.org). Right-click the same icon, click New Zone... and click the Secondary: radio-button. In the Zone: field enter 50.168.192.in-addr.arpa, in the Server: field enter
    192.168.50.175. Click Next. Click inside the Zone file: field where Windows will automatically enter the zone file name. Click Next. In the IP Master(s) field, enter 192.168.50.125. Click Add and then click Next. Click Finish.

    Inforoot.net (Primary, Windows 2000 Server)
    Click Start-Programs-Administrative Tools-DNS. Expand MSERV and click the Forward Lookup Zones folder. Right-click the same folder, and click New Zone... to start the wizard. Click Next on the introductory wizard page. The zone type we are creating is standard primary. Click Next. On the Zone Name wizard page, enter inforoot.net. Click Next twice, and then click Finish. The zone records we are going to add are an MX (mail exchanger) record for the inforoot.net domain pointing to mserv.inforoot.net, and pop3/smtp/mail aliases pointing to the same host as the MX record. The host record has already been created by Windows. Right-click the inforoot.net folder, click New Mail Exchanger... and browse to the mserv host record. Select the host record and click OK twice. To add the aliases, right-click the inforoot.net folder and click New Alias... In the Alias name field enter pop3, then, browse to the mserv host record, select the record and click OK twice. Repeat the same procedure for the smtp and mail aliases. Warning: do not accidentally select the already created aliases; we need to select the mserv host record for each alias.

    <


    Inforoot.net (Secondary, Windows NT 4.0 Server)

    Click Start-Programs-Administrative Tools(Common)-DNS Manager. Double-click the server icon (mserv2.easymail.org). Right-click the same icon, click New Zone... and click the Secondary: radio-button. In the Zone: field enter inforoot.net, in the Server: field enter 192.168.50.175. Click Next. Click inside the Zone file: field where Windows will automatically enter the zone file name. Click Next. In the IP Master(s) field, enter 192.168.50.125. Click Add and then click Next. Click Finish.

    Easymail.org (Primary, Windows NT 4.0 Server)

    Click Start-Programs-Administrative Tools(Common)-DNS Manager. Double-click the server icon (mserv2.easymail.org). Right-click the same icon, click New Zone... and click the Primary: radio-button. Click Next. In the Zone Name: field enter easymail.org. Click inside the Zone file: field where Windows will automatically enter the zone file name. Click Next. Click Finish. Right-click the easymail.org folder, click New Record... , scroll down to MX Record, select it and in the Mail Exchange Server DNS Name field enter mserv2.easymail.org. Enter 10 in the Preference Number field. Click OK. To add the aliases (pop3, smtp and mail), right-click the easymail.org folder, click New Record..., select CNAME record, in the Alias Name field enter pop3, in the For Host DNS Name field enter mserv2.easymail.org. Repeat the same procedure to enter the remaining two aliases.



    Easymail.org (Secondary, Windows 2000 Server)

    Click Start-Programs-Administrative Tools-DNS. Expand MSERV and click the Forward Lookup Zones folder. Right-click the same folder, and click New Zone... to start the wizard. Click Next on the introductory wizard page. The zone type we are creating is standard secondary, so click the Standard secondary radio button, and then click Next. In the Name: field, enter easymail.org. Click Next. On the Master DNS Servers wizard page, in the IP address: field, enter 192.168.50.175. Click Add, and then click Next. Click Finish.

    Installing EMWAC IMS

    Although installation has to be performed manually, installing EMWAC IMS is fairly simple and quite similar for both Windows NT 4.0 and Windows 2000. The procedures described below refer to both product versions, unless otherwise specified. First, we need to extract the zipped EMWAC IMS files downloaded from the Internet. The following file has to be copied to the %systemroot%System32 directory: ims.cpl.

    The following files may be placed anywhere on the hard drive(preferably in the same directory):
    imscmn.dll
    POP3S.exe
    SMTPDS.exe
    SMTPRS.exe

    Note: you might need to unhide files on the Windows NT 4.0 computer in order to be able to see the imscmn.dll file.

    For simplicity, we are going to place the files in the same directory as the ims.cpl file, that is, WINNTSystem32.

    Note:
    In case Microsoft IIS is installed, we need to stop and disable its SMTP service, if applicable.

    On the Windows 2000 computer, we need to add the following two registry entries (please consult Windows 2000 Server online help on registry editing, paying attention to warnings):

    HKLMsystemCurrentControlSetServicesTcpipParametersDomain
    type: REG_SZ
    value: inforoot.net

    HKLMsystemCurrentControlSetServicesTcpipParametersNameserver
    type: REG_SZ
    value: mserv.inforoot.net 192.168.50.125

    We do not need to add any additional registry entries for the Windows NT 4.0 computer.

    Now, we need to open a command prompt and enter the following:
    pop3s -install
    smtpds -install
    smtprs -install

    After entering each line, we should be notified of the successful installation of the respective service.

    Since we want these services to start automatically every time we reboot the computers, we need to change the service startup type of each service to automatic. On the Windows 2000 Server computer, click Start-Programs-Administrative Tools-Services. Look for the following services: IMS POP3 Server, IMS SMTP Delivery Agent and IMS SMTP Receiver. For each service, we need to do the following: Right-click the service, click Properties, change the startup type to Automatic, and start the service. Exit by clicking OK. On the Windows NT 4.0 computer, click Start-Settings-Control Panel-Services, select each service and repeat the actions performed on the Windows 2000 computer, with the difference that we need to single-click each service and use the buttons on the right-hand side to change the startup type and start the services.

    Now, we need to create some folders. In the root of the drive, create a folder named INETMAIL and, inside it, a folder named INBOX.

    Click Start-Programs-Control Panel-EMWAC IMS. On the Directories tab, change the default entry into:

    C:INETMAILINBOX%username%

    We need to write a batch file which will simplify our restarting the services, required after most changes to EMWAC IMS.

    The batch file must contain the following lines:
    net stop pop3s
    net start pop3s
    net stop smtpds
    net start smptds
    net stop smtprs
    net start smtprs

    Save the batch file as imsrestart.bat.

    On the Misc tab (on the Windows 2000 computer) in the SMTP Gateway Host field enter 192.168.50.175. In the Accept Mail For: field enter inforoot.net and click Add. Click OK. You will be warned that you must restart each service for the change to take effect. Click OK three times and execute the imsrestart.bat script. Repeat the same procedures on the Windows NT 4.0 computer, replacing the above information with the following information: easymail.org and 192.168.50.125. After that, execute the batch file to restart the services.

    Mail-Enabling Users

    Besides configuring the mail client software on the client computer, mail-enabling users requires also a couple of actions on the mail servers. In this example, we are going to create two local user accounts to be used for testing. We are then going to create two local groups on each server, named mailusers, whose members will be the local user accounts created for testing. The Log on as a Batch Job user right will be assigned to the members of that group.

    Windows 2000:

    Right-click the My Computer icon, click Manage, expand Local Users and Groups, click the Users folder, right-click the folder and click New User... The user name will be mailtester. Un-check the User must change password at next logon check-box and assign mail as the password. Click Create, and click Close. Now, click the Groups folder, right-click the folder and click New Group... Group name will be mailusers. Click the Add... button, locate the mailtester user account, select it and click the Add button, then click OK. Click Create, and then click Close. To assign the Log on as a Batch Job user right to the members of the group, click Start-Programs-Administrative Tools-Local Security Policy. Expand Local Policies, click User Right Assignment, and double-click Log on as a Batch Job in the right-hand pane. Click the Add button. Locate mailusers, select it and click the Add button. Click OK twice.

    Windows NT 4.0:

    Click Start-Programs-Administrative Tools (Common)-User Manager for Domains. Click User-New User... The user name will be mailuser. Un-check the User Must Change Password at Next Logon check-box and assign mail as the password. Click the Add.. button and then click Close. Click User-New Local Group... Name the group mailusers. Click the Add... button, locate mailuser, click on it and click the Add button. Click OK twice. To assign the Log on as a Batch Job user right to the members of the group, click Policies-User Rights... Place a check-mark beside Show Advanced User Rights, scroll down to, and select Log on as a Batch Job, click Add..., select mailusers and click Add. Click OK twice.

    Configuring the Mail Client

    It is assumed that Windows 2000 Professional is installed on the client computer. To set up the mail client on the client computer, first, we need to adjust the TCP/IP properties of the LAN adapter of the client computer. Right-click the My Network Places icon, click Properties, right-click the LAN adapter icon, select Internet Protocol (TCP/IP), click Properties, click on the Use the following IP address radio button, and enter 192.168.50.150 in the IP address field. Then, click in the Subnet mask field, and Windows will automatically enter the default Class C subnet mask – 255.255.255.0. In the default gateway field, enter 192.168.50.175. Click on the Use the following DNS server addresses radio button, and enter 192.168.50.125 in the Preferred DNS server field. In the Alternate DNS Server field enter 192.168.50.175. Click OK twice.

    To set up the mail client software, click Start-Programs-Outlook Express. Click File-Identities-Add New Identity..., type Mailtester as the name of the identity and click OK. Affirm that you want to switch to the new identity by clicking Yes. Select Create a new Internet mail account, and click Next. Display name will be Mailtester. E-Mail address will be mailtester@inforoot.net. Click Next. In the Incoming mail (POP3, IMAP or HTTP) server field enter pop3.inforoot.net. In the Outgoing mail (SMTP) server field enter smtp.inforoot.net. Click Next. The password is the one we assigned to the user account previously, that is, mail. Click Next, and click Finish. Select the Do not import at this time radio button, and click Next. Click Finish. Repeat the above procedure for the mailuser user account, using the following information: the name of the identity and the display name is Mailuser, the e-mail address is mailuser@easymail.org. Incoming mail (POP3, IMAP or HTTP) server is pop3.easymail.org. the Outgoing mail (SMTP) server is smtp.easymail.org. The password will be the same-mail.

    Testing

    Now, we need to test some functions critical for the proper operation of the DNS/mail servers we have created.

    DNS

    We need to test whether a hypothetical connecting SMTP server would get the correct referrals for the SMTP servers in our mail domains.

    On the client computer, open a command prompt by clicking Start-Programs-Accessories-Command Prompt. Type nslookup and press enter. Type set q=MX and press enter. Type inforoot.net and press enter. Type easymail.org and press enter. Below are the correct results:

    inforoot.net MX preference = 10, mail exchanger = mserv.inforoot.net

    easymail.org MX preference = 10, mail exchanger = mserv2.easymail.org internet address = 192.168.50.175

    Type exit and press enter.

    Ping each alias we created earlier (pop3.inforoot.net, smtp.inforoot.net, pop3.easymail.org etc.). If all pings are successful, we are ready to move on.

    EMWAC IMS

    The following test is to be performed on both servers. Open a command prompt by clicking Start-Run... and entering cmd. Type the following:

    pop3s -ipaddress
    smtpds -ipaddress
    smtprs -ipaddress

    The responses should be as follows:

    192.168.50.125 mserv.inforoot.net
    192.168.50.175 mserv2.easymail.org

    Then, from the client computer, connect to the ports 25 (SMTP) and 110 (POP3) on both servers. To do that, open a command prompt on the client computer by clicking Start-Run... and entering cmd. Type telnet and press enter. Type open 192.168.50.125 25 and press enter. This is the desired response:

    220 192.168.50.125 IMS SMTP Receiver Version 0.81 Ready

    Repeat the same procedure and connect to the port 110 on the same IP address, then, to the ports 25 and 110 on 192.168.50.175.

    Sending and Receiving mail

    This is the final test which will prove the ability of our newly created mail servers to send and receive mail.

    On the client computer, open Outlook Express and choose the mailtester identity. Send a message to mailuser@easymail.org. Switch identities, open the message received from the other test identity and reply to it. After switching back to the mailtester identity, if everything is in order, the reply message should appear in the inbox.

    About the Author:
    TERMS OF USE: This document, without modifications, may be used and/or distributed freely.

    Created with OpenOffice.org 1.0.1 and Microsoft Visio 2000. Questions and comments are welcome.

    S.Pejic
    Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer
    Belgrade, Serbia and Montenegro





    Comments (0)

    Be the first to comment on this article


    Related Items








    7 Seconds Resources, Inc.




    IT Showcase